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Visit a geopark

Geoparks are great places to explore Scotland’s rocks and discover how our icy past shaped the landscape we see today.

Scotland’s rocky foundations travelled across the world before they became one. In our geoparks, you can see the remains of deserts, seas, volcanoes and glaciers – all of which left their mark on the landscape we see today.

Find out about each of Scotland’s three geoparks:

Each website can tell you about activities, events and accommodation in the area, and direct you to useful leaflets and guides.

Geological features

For its size, Scotland has the most varied geology and landforms of any country in the world. Our three geoparks alone cover about 10% of our land area – and they’re full of fantastic features for you to explore.

Plan a visit today to see the remains of ancient lava flows and volcanoes, and rocks formed millions of years ago in tropical seas and scorching deserts. Get up close to plants and animals from past ages, preserved as fossils. Learn how ice sheets and meltwater rivers carved out and shaped the land.

Geopark status recognises an area’s outstanding geological heritage value and its benefit to local people through tourism and education. Visitors will find plenty to see and do to enable you to appreciate the area’s geological interests.

Learn more about the geopark designation.

Geopark trails

If you plan to cover a lot of ground in the North West Highlands Geopark, you can follow its Rock Route. Or choose from four Pebble Routes, each of which explores a smaller patch – Assynt, Coigach, Durness or Kinlochbervie.

Trails and exhibits for Geopark Shetland take in a volcanic landscape and even a piece of ocean crust. To find out what else to see on the islands, you can download the Geology leaflet from the Geopark Shetland website. A colour-coded map details all of the geological highlights.

Lochaber Geopark offers two Rock Route Journeys and a series of geotrail leaflets to help you to see another side to the scenery. You should take to your chosen geotrail by car and spend time at the six stopping places suggested. The leaflet explains the most important geological features along the way.

Discover geology trails outside Scotland’s geoparks.