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Glasdrum Wood NNR - Visiting the reserve

Visit Glasdrum Wood to explore a glorious woodland habitat, rich in wildflowers and rare butterflies.

Getting here

By car

From Oban, head north on the A85. Turn right onto the A828 at Connel and continue to Creagan Bridge. Turn onto the minor road and follow it for 3 kilometres along the north side of the loch to the car park.

PA38 4BQ is the nearest postcode.

Car park

There is a small car park at the entrance to the reserve.

By public transport

The nearest bus stop is in Creagan Bridge (4 kilometres) on the Oban to Fort Willian/Appin route.

The nearest train station is Connel Ferry (19 kilometres).

By bike

NCN Route 78 (Oban to Campbeltown) starts in Oban, 26 kilometres from the reserve. From Oban, head north on the A85.

Turn right onto the A828 at Connel and continue to Creagan Bridge. Turn onto the minor road and follow it for 3 kilometres along the north side of the loch to the car park.

Map

Glasdrum Wood National Nature Reserve

Reserve car park on the north side of Loch Creran, two miles east of the new Creagan Bridge and A828 Oban to Fort William road.

Bus service from Oban to Fort William.









For visitors

Visit Glasdrum Wood is a good introduction to the reserve.

Toilets

The nearest toilet is at the Creagan Inn on the main road (A828). There are others at tourist facilities nearby, such as the Stalker Castle View café.

Picnic areas

Enjoy a picnic at the table with space alongside for a wheelchair or buggy. It is set on hard standing next to the car park.

Rest areas

Take a break on one of the four benches (every 200 metres) along the path.

Trails for all

Follow the woodland trail circuit (1 kilometre). It’s well surfaced – but there are a few steep sections that some may find strenuous. Benches on the trail are convenient points to admire the stunning views of Loch Creran and the mountains beyond.

Seasonal highlights

You’re sure to find something of interest all year round at Glasdrum Wood. May to June is best for butterflies, plants and birds.

Spring

Visit in spring for a wealth of wildflowers. The forest floor is carpeted with bluebell, violet marsh thistle and bugle. The deep blue blooms of bugle are a favourite nectar source for the rare chequered skipper butterfly.

Summer

Few other places in Scotland can rival Glasdrum for its variety of butterflies and moths. Over the years, grazing and coppicing have created beautiful glades where butterflies flourish. This tradition continues today with red and roe deer grazing.

Autumn

The name Glasdrum means ‘grey ridge’ in the local dialect of Gaelic. It may have been named for the grey of the ash trees that thrive on the lime-rich soil running through the wood. In any season, the ash trees are ranged like pale statues across the slopes, contrasting with the darker tones of other native trees.

Winter

The wild woods of Glasdrum are glorious in winter. With the leaves gone from the trees, the beautiful mosses, liverworts and lichens are even more distinctive among the greys and greens. Red deer can be spotted grazing in the fringes of the wood.